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Season’s Greetings from all the team at the Georgian Papers Programme!

King's College London Feed - 15 December 2017 - 10:40am

Samantha Callaghan, Metadata Analyst, King’s Digital Laboratory, and Arthur Burns, Academic Director, Georgian Papers Programme, King’s College London All those involved in the Georgian Papers Programme would like to send all visitors to our websites, the scholars associated with the programme as fellows, and the King’s Friends season’s greetings and wish them all the best … Continue reading "Season’s Greetings from all the team at the Georgian Papers Programme!"

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Distributional Analysis of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act … Excluding the Effects of Eliminating the Individual Mandate Penalty

Govdocs headlines - 14 December 2017 - 11:58am

https://www.cbo.gov/system/files/115th-congress-2017-2018/reports/53349-distributionalanalysisletter.pdf

Letter to Chairman Hatch of the Senate Finance Committee revealing the projected effects out to 2027 on federal revenues and spending at various taxpayer income categories from the proposed legislation.  From the Congressional Budget Office

 

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Reconciliation Recommendations of the Senate Committee on Finance

Govdocs headlines - 14 December 2017 - 11:43am

https://www.cbo.gov/system/files/115th-congress-2017-2018/costestimate/reconciliationrecommendationssfc.pdf

Presents the official cost estimate of the Senate version of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act proposed legislation. From the Congressional Budget Office

 

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Hamilton’s George III in London

King's College London Feed - 11 December 2017 - 4:18am

by Karin Wulf Hamilton, a quintessentially American story, has arrived in London. While many American commenters and historians have focused on the “Ten Dollar Founding Father without a Father” and his compatriots, the racial politics of the founding period and the intentional casting of the musical, and the gendered politics of the Schuyler sisters and… … Continue reading "Hamilton’s George III in London"

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Final Report Summarizing Findings of the Review of Designations Under the Antiquities Act

Govdocs headlines - 7 December 2017 - 3:26pm

https://www.doi.gov/sites/doi.gov/files/uploads/revised_final_report.pdf

Final report of the Secretary of the Interior which reviews the Antiquities Act of 1906 and the relative roles of the legislation and executive branch in declaring monuments.  Reviews and provides recommendations for all monuments designated from 1996 to the present.  From the Interior Department

 

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Tis the Season

SLSC Blog - 6 December 2017 - 10:00am

In this month’s dog series post, we decided to focus on dog books related to the December holidays. In doing so, it became quickly apparent that while we have a small number of titles related to dogs and Christmas, we do not have titles related to Hanukkah or Kwanzaa. Our awareness of this deficiently will inform future collecting decisions. If there are specific titles you would like to suggest, please hit us up in the comments section.

In the meantime, please enjoy the covers of some of the Christmas-related dog books we currently have in our holdings.

Puppy who wanted a Boy cover

Thankfully, this book ends happily ever after.

Claude the Dog cover

Claude sweetly gives his presents to another dog who doesn’t receive gifts, because the best present of all, as far as Claude is concerned, is his human.

Twelve Dogs of ChristmasBark before Christmas cover

The post Tis the Season appeared first on An Acquired Taste - Swem Library Special Collections Blog.

Basque in the Archives

SLSC Blog - 22 November 2017 - 10:00am

Down in the belly of Special Collections sits a mysterious blue velvet box. Its contents are simultaneously mundane and bizarre, important for the study of language in Spain, and remarkably unremarkable. The box bears the inscription Matxin de Zalbaren Gutuna, La Carta de Machin de Zalba, 1416. What is it? Why do we have it? What makes it both special and ordinary?

Basque manuscript, Matxin de Zalbaren Gutuna, La Carta de Machin de Zalba, 1416

Basque manuscript, Matxin de Zalbaren Gutuna, La Carta de Machin de Zalba, 1416

It’s a facsimile of notes written at the beginning of the 15th century by court officials in the Navarre region of northern Spain. Seemingly commonplace, the note asks for explanation of a small budget deficiency before delving into the personal matter of dinner party attendance. Also included further down the page is the note’s reply. What’s really exciting is how the document is written. The first note starts in Romance (Spanish) before switching to the Basque language. The reply is written primarily in Basque. Before the discovery of the original, historians and linguists questioned whether or not the Basque language was widely spoken in Navarre. This example of high officials communicating in Basque, provides evidence that not only was the language writable and readable, but it was used by more than merely the lowest classes.

This is the most sizable example of Basque language writing before the Modern Era. It’s also the only extant text written in Basque before 1500. We have one of 356 copies made, one of only two listed on WorldCat, and the only one at an American university.

Written by Jane Snyder, Graduate Apprentice

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Estimated Deficits and Debt Under the … Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

Govdocs headlines - 16 November 2017 - 1:30pm

https://www.cbo.gov/system/files/115th-congress-2017-2018/costestimate/hr1deficitsanddebt.pdf

Estimates that passage of the proposed legislation in its current form would increase federal deficits to $1.7 trillion in the 2018-2027 period and bring the debt figure to 97.1% of GDP.  From the Congressional Budget Office

 

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2016 Hate Crime Statistics

Govdocs headlines - 16 November 2017 - 12:03pm

https://ucr.fbi.gov/hate-crime/2016

Contains details of 5% rise in hate crimes during 2016 compared to the previous year.  Most attacks were directed against Blacks, Jews, Muslims, and LGBT people.  Covers information about the crimes, victims, offenders, and locations.  From the Federal Bureau of Investigation

 

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Family Donates Civil War Diary of Henry Alexander Scandrett

SLSC Blog - 13 November 2017 - 9:00am
Henry Alexander Scandrett's pocket diary (SC 00144)

Henry Alexander Scandrett’s pocket diary (SC 00144)

This past spring Sharon Summers, Charles W. Scandrett, Janet S. Hunt, Barbara J. Kaufman, and Sandra S. Ellender generously donated the Civil War diary of Henry Alexander Scandrett to the Special Collections Research Center. Scandrett fought for the Union during the war and recorded his experiences in the pocket diary. His diary begins on May 5, 1862 with a significant announcement:

Was in my first battle today. About 1 Oclock P.M. our regiment was marched into the field about. We were thrown in advance and through some blunder was not reinforced. We have lost all our company officers and our field officers are all wounded. With fifteen others I was taken prisoner and am now in William & Mary college.

 

James Taylor drawing of the Wren Building, ‘Rear view of the College VA’, August 17, 1862. This is what the Wren building would have looked like when Henry A. Scandrett was imprisoned there. Union soldiers from the 5th Pennsylvania Cavalry burned the Wren building in September 1862.

James Taylor drawing of the Wren Building, ‘Rear view of the College VA’, August 17, 1862.
This is what the Wren Building would have looked like when Henry A. Scandrett was imprisoned there. Union soldiers from the 5th Pennsylvania Cavalry burned the Wren Building in September 1862.

Page from Scandrett's diary, mentioning being held prisoner at W&M.

Page from Scandrett’s diary, mentioning being held prisoner at W&M.

Other daily entries document camp life, weather, rations, and events, including serving as a pallbearer for the funeral of one young soldier who died from typhoid fever. Scandrett documents several close encounters with “the enemy,” in one instance writing that “The rebels were firing all night, killing 1 man and wounding three, one mortally.”

 

 

Scandrett’s diary is a valuable primary source that reveals fragments of the College’s past, as well as events from the nation’s history. It is one of many artifacts among the Special Collections Research Center’s vast collections that are regularly used by faculty, students, and researchers globally to piece together important historical narratives.

W&M Libraries’ Digital Services team digitized Scandrett’s diary and you can access the scans via W&M’s Digital Archive.

KALE

 

 

 

 

Author and historian Wilford Kale (class of ‘66) was instrumental in coordinating the donation of the Scandrett diary. Kale recently published his latest book, From Student to Warrior: A Military History of The College of William and Mary, which features many items from Special Collections. Join us for his book talk today, Monday, November 13 at 5:30pm in the Ford Classroom in Swem Library, when he will discuss the role the university and its faculty, students, and alumni have played in the military from the French and Indian War to the present day.

 

The post Family Donates Civil War Diary of Henry Alexander Scandrett appeared first on An Acquired Taste - Swem Library Special Collections Blog.

Important announcement: The Launch of the King’s Friends Network

King's College London Feed - 10 November 2017 - 5:57am

10 November 2017 sees an important milestone in the evolution of the Georgian Papers Programme with the public launch of The King’s Friends network. The King’s Friends is a free-to-join international community of those whose work stands to benefit from the digitization of the Georgian papers in the Royal Archives, and who in turn can … Continue reading "Important announcement: The Launch of the King’s Friends Network"

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Creating the Georgian Archive

King's College London Feed - 10 November 2017 - 5:55am

by Karin Wulf Out of the Royal Archives, high up in the Round Tower at Windsor Castle, the Georgian Papers Programme is bringing to digital life an extraordinary Georgian collection.  The Georgian Papers are a marvelously rich mix of different types of documents, including letters, account books, menus, and more.  As we hear at gatherings… … Continue reading "Creating the Georgian Archive"

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Two Months in the Royal Archives, May-June 2015

King's College London Feed - 10 November 2017 - 4:00am

 By Flora Fraser, GPP Fellow, Researcher and Author Memories of past years I spent researching books in the Royal Archives are crystal clear. I first went in autumn, just before the end of October 1988, when I would be thirty. I was awed to be climbing the many stone steps inside the Round Tower, Windsor … Continue reading "Two Months in the Royal Archives, May-June 2015"

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George I and George II and the Royal Archives: the missing monarchs?

King's College London Feed - 9 November 2017 - 4:00am

By Dr Andrew Thompson, Queens’ College, Cambridge   George III is the Hanoverian monarch perhaps most frequently associated with the Royal Archives. The king’s own voluminous correspondence forms an important part of the collection and, in the early nineteenth century, his son, as Prince Regent, was instrumental in helping to secure the two collections that … Continue reading "George I and George II and the Royal Archives: the missing monarchs?"

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Current research in the Georgian papers: a symposium to take stock, Windsor, 4 September 2017

King's College London Feed - 9 November 2017 - 4:00am

By Arthur Burns, Academic Director of the Georgian Papers Programme, King’s College London As we launch the second tranche of digitized documents for the Georgian Papers project, this is a good moment to reflect on the progress of academic research related to the project. On 4 September 2017 the Royal Archives at Windsor Castle hosted … Continue reading "Current research in the Georgian papers: a symposium to take stock, Windsor, 4 September 2017"

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Must Love Dogs: 11/11/18

SLSC Blog - 8 November 2017 - 10:00am

In 1918, at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, an armistice was signed between the Allies and Germany, effectively ending World War I. This Saturday marks the anniversary of this event, commemorated as Veteran’s Day in the United States, Armistice Day in France, and Remembrance Day in the United Kingdom. In honor of this event, our November Dog Book series blog post highlights a booklet about some of the dogs of World War I.

Cover Page

Cover page of “War Dogs of the World War”

Group Shot

Dogs training for service in the French Army

“War Dogs of the World War,” published in 1919, is dedicated “To those who love dogs, those faithful friends of mankind.” In 1914, animal lover Countess Mary Yourkevitch (a native-born Russian who made France her adopted home), established the Refuge in Neuilly, a training school whose sole purpose was to train dogs for war work. Some were trained to work for the Red Cross, some for trench work, and others became messengers. Six hundred dogs were trained and sent to the Front. Some made the ultimate sacrifice; some returned crippled; and some returned unscathed, at least physically. After the war’s end, dozens of these dogs returned to the Countess’s care.  John I. Anderson, the author of the booklet, wrote, “Knowing the burden placed upon her, both in a financial and physical sense, I am writing this story of the heroic deeds of these wonderful animals. Every penny derived from the sale of this booklet will be devoted to assist this noble work of the Countess Yourkevitch of Neuilly, France.” To be honest, several of his stories of individual dogs are truly heartbreaking, such as that of Monte, who worked as a picket dog and returned to France after four years of service, suffering from shell shock and completely traumatized.

Monte

Monte, the Picket

However, Anderson also introduces us to Toby, the fox terrier whose job was to keep the trenches free of rats. Toby served three years at the Front and is credited with killing four thousand rats during that time. He was returned to the Countess after a stray bullet cost him part of a leg. Despite his energy, Anderson describes Toby as the “most agile three-footed tyke I ever saw, and sets the pace for all the other dogs in their gambols about the grounds.” We also learn that the soldiers taught Toby some tricks, including saying his prayers, rolling over, and singing.

Toby

Toby, credited with killing 4000 rats on the Front

Anderson also describes meeting Dick, a French poodle, who had worked for two years as a guide at the Soldiers’ Home for the Blind. Anderson writes, “It is no unusual sight to see two men or more, arm in arm, being guided by Dick through various parts of the grounds. Sometimes you meet them picking their way through the adjacent streets, Dick always on the alert for their safety.”

Dick

Dick the Guide

It’s only fitting that we take the time to also remember and acknowledge the service of military dogs this Saturday. “War Dogs of the World War” is just one of many titles associated with war dogs. If you are interested in learning more about our holdings, please visit the W&M Libraries online catalog or visit us in Special Collections.  We’ll be happy to help you!

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Climate Science Special Report: Fourth National Climate Assessment, Vol. 1

Govdocs headlines - 6 November 2017 - 8:50am

https://science2017.globalchange.gov/

The first of two volumes.  States that global temperatures have warmed by 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit since 1901 and it is “extremely likely” that human activities, especially emissions of greenhouse gases, are the dominant cause.  Includes sections on climate models, scenarios, precipitation and temperature changes, extreme storms, sea level rise, and more.  From the U.S. Global Change Research Program.

 

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Presidential Memorandum: Combatting the National Drug Demand and Opioid Crisis

Govdocs headlines - 27 October 2017 - 8:26am

https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/10/26/presidential-memorandum-heads-executive-departments-and-agencies

Describes the loss of life and other damage caused by addictive drugs and calls upon the Secretary of Health and Human Services to declare a Public Health Emergency.  Cites rise in opioid prescriptions, heroin from Mexico, and fentanyl from China as major culprits.  From the White House

 

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JFK Assassination Records, 2017 Additional Documents Release

Govdocs headlines - 27 October 2017 - 8:25am

https://www.archives.gov/research/jfk/2017-release

Covers the release of nearly 3,000 additional documents, mostly from the CIA and FBI, related to the assassination of President John Kennedy.  The release was mandated by the JFK Assassination Records Collection Act.  A few additional documents are scheduled to be released next spring.  From the National Archives and Records Administration

 

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