Past "From Fights to Rights" Exhibits

  • Slavery at William & Mary is a chapter that until recently had often been left out of written histories. From its founding in 1693 to the outbreak of the Civil War, the college owned, hired out, and rented slaves.
  • The Fall of the “Cockade City” and the End of the Confederacy

    As Swem Library wraps up its commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act, it is clear that both the politics and execution of war are complex and difficult.
  • The American Civil War was not fought just within the borders of the United States. There were global machinations as well as naval conflicts on the high seas.
  • William & Mary (In)action During the Civil Rights Movement

    Drawing from Special Collections’ University Archives holdings, this exhibit highlights selected articles, lectures and other events on William & Mary’s campus from the 1940s-1960s, that relate to the struggle for equality for all Americans.
  • Paperwork of the Civil War

    While the maxim that an army marches on its stomach is true, it is equally true that an army marches on its paperwork.
  • Conceived as a demonstration of American Cold War consensus, the Civil War centennial revealed how divided the country remained 100 years after Fort Sumter.
  • Integration at William & Mary was not achieved simply with the acceptance of the first students of color; instead it has been a decades-long process.