Honoring Local Leaders: Rev. Curtis Harris

Duration: 
July 22, 2015 to March 31, 2016

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Curtis marching in downtown Hopewell VA in the 1970's. Image courtesy of Joanne Lucas.

 

While people like Martin Luther King, Jr. brought national attention to the civil rights movement, many of the gains made in the 1960s and beyond were built upon a foundation of activism at the local level. Civil rights activists like Rev. Curtis Harris (1924-) were involved in national organizations, but were even more important for putting national-level ideas into practice in their local communities. Over the course of a fifty-year career, Rev. Harris has served his community of Hopewell, Virginia, not only as a civil rights activist, but also as political official and religious leader.

 

Images of the exhibit are available from Swem Library on Flickr.

Curator: Matt Anthony, Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of American Studies and 2014-2015 Archives Apprentice; Exhibit design and installation: Jennie Davy, Burger Archives Specialist, with assistance from Kelly Manno, Undergraduate Student Assistant.