Exhibits

  • November 3, 2017 to November 30, 2017

    This collection features objects that our patrons left behind in library books or around the building. Many were not exactly lost but rather forgotten; others may have been more purposely left behind.

  • November 16, 2017 to November 15, 2018

    In our digital age, it is sometimes easy to forget about the importance of printing in human history, particularly as many people now almost never hold a physical newspaper or book in their hands.

  • October 17, 2017 to December 22, 2017

    This exhibit features student artwork from Chinese calligraphy courses taught at William & Mary in MLL's Chinese Studies Program.

  • September 15, 2017 to May 13, 2018

    When Janet Brown, Lynn Briley, and Karen Ely first moved into their freshmen dorms in Jefferson Hall at William & Mary, they were unaware of the significance of their presence — the three women were the first African Americans in residence at the college.

  • August 31, 2017 to January 15, 2018

    As a part of the commemorative efforts, William & Mary’s oral historian, alongside Special Collections and the 50th Anniversary Committee, is recording the stories of alumni, faculty and staff in an effort to gain a greater understanding of the experiences of African Americans living on campus during these first fifty years.

  • July 18, 2017 to May 13, 2018

    Broadly centered on the theme of seasonality, this exhibit draws on a collection of cookbooks and recipe books housed in Swem Library's Special Collections Research Center to explore what individuals and communities ate, how they labored, and how they coped with centuries of changes in availability and access to foods.

  • June 21, 2017 to January 31, 2018

    This exhibition shows only a sampling of the travel books in Swem Library’s Special Collections at William & Mary. The works on display describe the world in words but also with maps and topographical views as well as pictures of plants, animals, and people; that convey in words and images the languages, history, and mores of the places visited in the early modern period.