Putting the Unity in Community

Activities and Activism at William & Mary
Duration: 
October 2, 2020 to October 29, 2020
3 photos of students and lawyers protesting against racism in the legal profession and the law school, published in the Flat Hat on March 20, 1981
Photos of students and lawyers protesting against racism in the legal profession and the law school, published in the Flat Hat on March 20, 1981.

I Think I'm Done with the Sofa

While baking, watching movies, and doomscrolling are perfectly acceptable ways to spend a day, it is also possible to go outside and meet friends, document, and organize. William & Mary has a history of forging bonds and communities out of doors, showing the importance of staying together and the idea that “together” comes in different shapes and sizes.

Healthy Together is not just social distancing, it is also about finding and maintaining a community in the midst of upheaval and uncertainty that helps you feel safe and seen. A community can be Deadheads playing Ultimate Frisbee in the Sunken Garden, Black Lives Matter protests calling for abolishing the police, or Zelda Haus writing a letter to her mother in order to avoid doing homework. The artifacts in Special Collections promise that there is no experience too big or too small to be remembered and archived.   

If only for a few minutes a day, try to go outside. And don’t forget sunscreen!


Curation: Erna Anderson, Ph.D. Candidate in American Studies and Exhibits Apprentice in Special Collections

Design: Abram Clear '21, SCRC Graphics Student Assistant

Fabrication and Installation: Jennie Davy, Exhibits Manager, and Erna Anderson