American Studies: US History

19th century U.S. urban and regional newspapers. Fully searchable. Coverage: 1800-early 20th century.
Multidisciplinary database of journal articles (including peer reviewed), books, book chapters, reports, conference proceedings, etc. Coverage: 1887-present.
Find diverse global perspectives on topics related to controversial issues, the environment, health, education, science, the arts, literature, business, economics, criminal justice, and more from a variety of current and retrospective news media including newspapers, newswires, broadcast transcripts, blogs, periodicals, videos and web-only content. Includes local news, editorials, announcements and other sections from over 12,000 sources and 200+ countries. Includes Virginian-Pilot Historical Archive, 1865-1989. Date coverage varies with individual newspaper.
Collections of 18th- and 19th-century newspapers. Includes these collections: African American Newspapers, 1827-1909 ; African American Newspapers in the South ; America & World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, Part I & II: 1916-1923 ; America & World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, Part III: The AMAROC News ; American County Histories ; American Inventor ; The Civil War Collection, 1855-1869 ; Frank Leslie’s Weekly, 1855-1922 ; Godey’s Lady’s Book, 1830-1898 ; The Liberator, 1831-1865 ; National Anti-Slavery Standard, 1840-1870 ; Native Americans in History ; The Pennsylvania Gazette, 1728-1815 ; Quarantine and Disease Control in America Series, Parts I-II ; South Carolina Newspapers, 1732-1780 ; The Virginia Gazette, 1736-1780 ; The Woman’s Tribune, 1883-1909 ; Women’s Suffrage Collection
A fully searchable collection of high-quality e-books in the humanities which have been reviewed and recommended by scholars. These titles are offered by the American Council of Learned Societies in collaboration with twenty learned societies, over 100 contributing publishers, and librarians at the University of Michigan's Scholarly Publishing Office.
Provides access to the following Adam Matthew databases: American History, 1493-1945; American Indian Histories and Cultures; American West; Colonial America; Everyday Life & Women in America c. 1800-1920; India, Raj & Empire; Popular Culture in Britain and America, 1950-1975; Slavery, Abolition and Social Justice, 1490-2007; Virginia Company Archives Online. Access is available to all alumni through Alumni Association accounts. The link above will take you to your my1693 member login page; please log in to access this resource.
Considered the authoritative edition of John Adamss complete diaries, selected legal papers, family correspondence, and state papers. Searchable across all volumes. Begun by editor Lyman Butterfield and continued by Margaret Hogan. A Rotunda Collections database. Coverage ongoing, begins 1735.
Focusing predominantly on Atlanta, Chicago, New York, and towns and cities in North Carolina this resource presents multiple aspects of the African American community through pamphlets, newspapers and periodicals, correspondence, official records, reports and in-depth oral histories, revealing the prevalent challenges of racism, discrimination and integration, and a unique African American culture and identity.
Broad coverage of African American history, culture, and daily life. Newspapers from over 35 states. Coverage: 1827-1998.
African Americans and Jim Crow, 1883-1922 contains more than 1,000 fully searchable printed works from the beginning of Jim Crow to post-World War I. These works provide insights into African American culture and life during this period of segregation and disenfranchisement and include such topics as African American identity, relationships with peoples of other nations, and literature.
African Americans and Reconstruction, 1865-1883 contains nearly 1,400 fully searchable printed works from the end of the Civil War to the beginning of Jim Crow. It includes documents related to African Americans and citizenship, voting rights, literacy, land rights, employment, and more, including the gaps between written law and practice.
Age of Emancipation includes numerous rare documents related to emancipation in the United States, as well as Latin America and the Caribbean. This collection supports the study of many areas, including activities of the federal government in dealing with former slaves and the Freedmen's Bureau, views of political parties and post-war problems with the South, documents of the British and French government on the slave trade, reports from the West Indies and Africa, and other topics.
Cross-searchable access to millions of pages of essential American history, literature and culture. Uncover captivating manuscript and typescript letters, diaries, notebooks, journals, newspapers, plus incredible art works, illustrations, photographs, video and 360-degree objects.
American history, literature, culture, and daily life. Choose this database to search the following as one file: American Broadsides and Ephemera, Series 1, 1760-1900; Early American Imprints, Series I: Evans, 1639-1800; Supplement from the Library Company of Philadelphia (LCP) 1670-1800; Supplement from the American Antiquarian Society (AAS) 1652-1800. Early American Imprints, Series II: Shaw-Shoemaker, 1801-1819; Supplement from the Library Company of Philadelphia (LCP) 1801-1819; Supplement from the American Antiquarian Society (AAS) 1801-1819. Coverage: Varies.
Newspapers from all 50 states with eyewitness reporting, letters, advertisements, obituaries, etc. Includes access to Series I (1690-1876), Series II (1758-1900), Series III (1829-1922), Series IV (1756-1922), and Series V (1777-1922). Coverage: 1690-1922.
Provides full text coverage of the history and culture of the United States and Canada from prehistory to the present. Includes nearly 200 journals and 100 books, selective indexing for over 1,700 journals, and abstracts in English of foreign language articles.
Provides digital access to a highly comprehensive collection of American periodicals published between 1691 and 1912. Subject coverage includes: advertising, health, women's issues, science, the history of slavery, industry and professions, religious issues, culture and the arts, and more. Produced by a partnership between EBSCO and the American Antiquarian Society (AAS).
Founded in New York City in 1857, The American Hebrew was established as the weekly source of news impacting international Jewish communities. Reports on the persecution of Jews in Romania and Russia, and the subsequent influx of Jewish immigrants to the U.S., were of intense interest to readers of the paper.
People and events in American history and their presentation over time. Commercial and governmental newsreels, archival footage, public affairs footage, and important documentaries. Coverage: 1492-2000. **All films have public performance rights.**
Contains books, maps, artwork, and other primary source materials from the Gilder Lehrman Collection. It is divided into two modules: Module 1 Settlement, Commerce, Revolution and Reform: 1493-1859; and Module 2 Civil War, Reconstruction and the Modern Era: 1860-1945.
Descriptions of peoples and cultures, tribal factionalism, relations with the US government, sex roles, efforts at Christian education, aboriginal and post-contact Indian culture, the many problems and achievements of missionary work, etc. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1833-1893.
From historic pressings to contemporary periodicals, explore nearly 200 years of Indigenous print journalism from the US and Canada. With newspapers representing a huge variety in publisher, audience and era, discover how events were reported by and for Indigenous communities.
American Indians and the American West consists of one module on American Indians and the American West from 1809-1971. This module contains several collections focusing on the interaction between American Indians and the U.S. government in the 19th and 20th Centuries. Notable collections in this module from the 19th Century focus on Indian Removal from 1832-1840, the U.S. Army and American Indians in the years from the 1850s-1890s, including detailed coverage of Indian Wars. The featured collections on the 20th Century are Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and records from the Major Council Meetings of American Indian Tribes.
Let there be light has been the motto of The American Israelite since it was first published in 1854 with the intention to illuminate principles of Jewish faith and instill a sense of community among American Jews who often lived in geographically dispersed locations. This weekly is considered the longest-running English-language Jewish newspaper available in the country.
The American Jewish Congress, founded in 1918 under the leadership of Louis Brandeis, Felix Frankfurter, and Rabbi Stephen S. Wise, is one of the most important organizations dedicated to advocating for the interests of the American Jewish community and defending the civil rights of all Americans. The American Jewish Congress Records span from 1915-2009 and document the American Jewish Congress’s impact on the United States legal system, civil rights and liberties, the fight against discrimination and antisemitism, and support for the State of Israel. The records of the American Jewish Congress are digitized by ProQuest from the holdings of the American Jewish Historical Society. This module represents the first seven series of the collection, covering the history of the American Jewish Congress, the proceedings of its governing committees, the files of the Executive Directors, and records of the organization’s national conventions.
Biographical articles of men and women who helped shape the nation. All eras and walks of life. Coverage: varies.
This database contains periodicals published between 1740 and 1940, including special interest and general magazines, literary and professional journals, children's and women's magazines and many other historically-significant periodicals.
American Politics and Society consists of a wide range of 19th and 20th century material. Going in chronological order, the first module in this category are the papers of one of the most prolific inventors in American History, Thomas A. Edison Papers. The other modules in this category consist of immigration records to the United States during the massive immigration wave from 1880-1930; legal collections from the Harvard Law School Library featuring the papers of three Supreme Court Justices, the first Black federal judge, and one of the most infamous criminal cases of the 20th century; papers of the Progressive leader Robert M. La Follette; records from the Franklin D. Roosevelt White House and other federal agencies on the New Deal and World War II; FBI Files on radical politics; records of the Truman and Eisenhower Presidencies; records of Students for a Democratic Society, Vietnam Veterans Against the War, and other anti-Vietnam War organizations; and records on American Politics from the beginning of the Kennedy administration through the Nixon Administration.
Collection of databases devoted to disciplines in history and the social sciences. See titles of individual databases for further information. Coverage: Varies by database.
This archive focuses on Argentina after the era of Juan Pern. In this period civilian administrations traded power, trying, with limited success, to deal with diminished economic growth and continued social and labor demands. The documents offer insight into various aspects of the Argentine economy. Examples include: the minister of public works discussing a program in "highways, railroads, and water transport" (June 1960); a report on the newly appointed undersecretary of mines requesting that the embassy's economic counselor have the U.S. government "examine the possibilities of procurement of tungsten" (June 1961); and a resolution by the National Cinematographic Institute requiring that all films exhibited in motion picture theaters feature Spanish subtitles "accompanied by written proof that the dialogue has been has been translated and subtitled in Argentina" (April 1962).
From the dust of the territorys new capital, Phoenix, The Arizona Republican arose in 1890 to ultimately become the states largest newspaper. Delivering news about a changing world to its readers, The Arizona Republican focused on local and national politics and ways to make the territory a better place to live. It was instrumental in the campaign for Arizona statehood, which was achieved in 1912. Coverage: 1890-2007
Prior to the nineteenth century, much of what was known as the Far East remained closed to all but the most determined missionaries, traders, and sea captains. But in the nineteenth century the countries of these regions were confronted head-on by Western nations and forced into an expanding level of contactan opening that was fraught with domestic social unrest and foreign conflict, especially in China. Nineteenth Century Collections Online: Asia and the West illustrates the interaction between Asia and the West through a variety of rich source material, predominantly including US State Department consular and diplomatic records, British Foreign Office political correspondence, missionary correspondence and journals, and socio-economic journals.
With vetted content from quality sources—including newspapers, magazines, videos, newswires, journals and interview transcripts— Asian Life in America, Series 3: 2018-Today is vital for understanding the ever evolving experiences of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. From the Muslim immigration ban to the surge in hate crimes to rising interest in Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, contemporary news continues to shape and inform Asian American life.
One of the largest collections of historical and contemporary imagery. The Associated Press Images Collection contains millions of photos from 1826 to the present, that capture the greatest moments in history, news, sports and entertainment. More than 3,500 photos are added daily.
A major daily newspaper of the Atlanta area, the Atlanta Constitution covers political, economic, cultural, and social life of the southeastern United States from Reconstruction through the late 20th century. This historical newspaper provides genealogists, researchers and scholars with online, easily-searchable first-hand accounts and unparalleled coverage of the politics, society and events of the time. Coverage: 1868-1984
W.A. Scott II founded the Atlanta Daily World at a time when most black Americans lived in the South. He felt that the race problem could only be solved in the South, which required an informed community. Rather than reading news about African-Americans through the optics of a host of prejudiced white papers, he launched his own newspaper to educate, inspire, uplift, and promote the expression of the Southern black community. Coverage: 1931-2003
One of the most widely circulated African American newspapers on the Atlantic Coast. News articles, photos, advertisements, obituaries, cartoons, etc. Full page and article images with searchable full text. Coverage: 1893-1988.
All aspects of native North American culture, history, and life. Includes native peoples of Alaska, Canada, the US, and Mexico north of the northern boundary of Mesoamerica. Citations to books, essays, journal articles, and government documents of the US and Canada. Coverage: 16th century-present.
This collection searches a unique set of primary sources from African Americans actively involved in the movement to end slavery in the United States between 1830 and 1865.
Founded by Booker T. Washington to enhance the economic prosperity of the African American community. Assorted documents. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1901-1928.
The Associates of Dr. Bray was a group comprised of English clergymen and philanthropists who created and funded schools for Black, and to a lesser extent, Indigenous North American, children in the American Colonies between 1758 and 1776. Their aim was not only to educate, but also to Christianise their pupils. This collection contains correspondence files, minute books, and financial reports compiled by the Associates during the period 1724-1900. It also includes some relevant documents that pre-date the organisation itself.
The legal and politcal controversies that followed the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Several White House documentary collections, including memoranda, talking points, correspondence, legal briefs, transcripts, draft legislation, etc. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1989-1991.
Explore an extensive range of archival material connected to the trading and cultural relationships that emerged between China, America and the Pacific region between the 18th and early 20th centuries. Manuscript sources, rare printed texts, visual images, objects and maps document this fascinating history.
Spanning three centuries (c1750-1929), this resource makes available for the first time extremely rare pamphlets from Cornell University Librarys Charles W. Wason Collection on East Asia. The resource is full-text searchable, allowing for the collection to be comprehensively explored and studied.
With documents encompassing events from the earliest English embassy to the birth and early years of the Peoples Republic, this resource collects sources from nine archives to give an incredible insight into the changes in China during this period.
This database allows you to search and view public domain newspaper pages (1690-1963) and find information about American newspapers published between 1690-present.
The collection provides historical, personal, and professional information about the inhabitants of a city and information about the city's civic, social, benevolent, and literary organizations.
The collection provides historical, personal, and professional information about the inhabitants of a city and information about the city's civic, social, benevolent, and literary organizations. City directories are among the most comprehensive sources of historical and personal information available. Their emphasis on ordinary people and the common-place event make them important in the study of American history and culture. One of the few means available for researchers to uncover information on specific individuals, these directories provide such information as:
ProQuest History Vault's coverage of the Black Freedom Struggle offers the opportunity to study the most well-known and also unheralded events of the Black Freedom Struggle in the 20th Century from the perspective of the men, women, and sometimes even children who waged one of the most inspiring social movements in American history. This category consists of the NAACP Papers and federal government records, organizational records, and personal papers regarding the Black Freedom Struggle in the 20th Century.
Army life 1861-1865 through regimental histories and first-person accounts. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1865-1920.
These generals' reports of service represent an attempt by the Adjutant General's Office (AGO) to obtain more complete records of the service of the various Union generals serving in the Civil War. In 1864, the Adjutant General requested that each such general submit "a succinct account of your military historysince March 4th, 1861." In 1872, and in later years, similar requests were made for statements of service for the remaining period of the war.
The enactment and implementation of the Clean Air Act Amendments and other environmental issues. News clippings, articles and editorials, speeches, studies and research reports, memoranda, etc. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1989-1991.
This collection will provide a unique opportunity to read the recollections of many of the players in the Cold War. These transcripts of oral recollections will assist scholars in understanding the motivations for conflict and conciliation. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1950s-1990s.
Colonial America makes available all 1,450 volumes of the CO 5 series from The National Archives, UK, covering the period 1606 to 1822. CO 5 consists of the original correspondence between the British government and the governments of the American colonies, making it a uniquely rich resource for all historians of the period. Access: Modules 1 - 5
England's governance of, and activities in, the American, Canadian, and West Indian colonies. Digitized versions of the Privy Council and Related Bodies: America and West Indies, Colonial Papers (Collection CO 1 from The National Archives, London) and the Calendar of State Papers, Colonial: North America and the West Indies 1574-1739. Fully searchable. Coverage: 1574-1757.
This collection of U.S. State Department Central Classified Files relates to commercial and trade relations beginning in the Tsarist Russia period and extending through Khrushchev period in Soviet history. It contains a wide range of materials from U.S. diplomats including materials on treaties, general conditions affecting trade, imports and exports, laws and regulations, customs administration, tariffs, and ports of entry activities.
The collections in this module deliver unique coverage of the Confederate Army and the Union Army. The Confederate Army records consist of Confederate Military Manuscripts sourced from the holdings of Virginia Historical Society; the Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections, Louisiana State University; the Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin; and the University of Virginia.
The real and true history of (Southern) public opinion during the war. A mixture of issues and papers, some only single issues. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1860-1865.
Explore documents covering a broad sweep of history from c1824-1961, taking in the USA, Canada, the Caribbean and Central America.
The Dominican Republic has experienced many setbacks on the road to democracy. Dominican political history has been defined by traditions of "personalism," militarism, and social and economic elitism which has undermined its efforts to establish liberal constitutional rule. This collection includes U.S. State Department, U.S. Embassy, and Dominican Republic governmental dispatches, instructions, and miscellaneous correspondence dealing with topics such as political affairs and government; public order and safety; military affairs; social matters (including history and culture); economic conditions (including immigration and emigration); industry and agriculture; communications and transportation; and navigation.
Documents the founding of the Third Republic, created as a result of a compromise between pre-war Czechoslovak Republic leaders and the Czech Communist Party (KSC). An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1945-1963.
Daily Press (Newport News, Virginia) as it appears on microfilm (full-page images with a page-by-page browsing format). Updated monthly.
Full text coverage of the Daily Press (Newport News, VA)
Since 1898, the Dayton Daily News has reported on historical events as the evening paper for the residents of Dayton, Ohio. Its pages offer researchers a fascinating glimpse into the history and economic, cultural, and social life of Ohio, the U.S., and the world from 1898-1922.
Debates over Slavery and Abolition sheds light on the abolitionist movement, the conflicts within it, the anti- and pro-slavery arguments of the period, and the debates on the subject of colonization. It explores all facets of the controversial topic, with a focus on economic, gender, legal, religious, and government issues.
This historic newspaper was first in many ways: First U.S. newspaper to print a regular Sunday edition, first U.S. newspaper to publish court testimony, and the first American newspaper published in Europe when it began a London edition in 1881. A fundamental resource for labor relations, union history, and the automotive industry.
From the award-winning, nongovernmental National Security Archive, this resource consists of expertly curated, and meticulously indexed, declassified government documents covering U.S. policy toward critical world events including their military, intelligence, diplomatic and human rights dimensions from 1945 to the present.
Traces the progress of the Constitution and Bill of Rights through each of the thirteen states conventions. Convention and legislative records, private papers, letters, newspapers, broadsides, and pamphlets. Fully searchable. A Rotunda Collections database. Coverage: 1776-1791.
The Documenting White Supremacy and Its Opponents collection includes papers promoting and opposing white supremacy, published mainly in the 1920s. It brings together for the first time local, regional, and national newspapers published by Klan organizations and by sympathetic publishers from across the US. It also includes key anti-Klan voices from newspapers published by American Black, Catholic, and Jewish communities.
All known correspondence of Dolley Madison, wife of President James Madison. A Rotunda Collections database. Coverage ongoing, begins 1788.
Early Encounters in North America: Peoples, Cultures, and the Environment contains 1,482 authors and over 100,000 pages of letters, diaries, memoirs and accounts of early encounters.
Political, military, economic, social, industrial, and other internal conditions and events in East Germany. Predominantly instructions to and dispatches from US diplomatic and consular personnel. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1950-1963.
Formerly 19th Century Masterfile. Covers scholarly sources from the 12th century to early 20th century. Includes Earl Gregg Swem's Virginia Historical Index; Poole's Index to Periodical Literature; Niles' Register; American Memory; links to images in ArtSTOR; plus many more. Citations to magazine articles, books, newspapers, patents, and US/UK government documents, and images. Coverage: 1106-1930 (varies by source).
This collection includes the proceedings of the 1832-1988 Democratic National Conventions, providing gavel to gavel coverage, including speeches, debates, votes, and party platforms. Also included are lists of names of convention delegates and alternates. Records of the earliest proceedings are based in part on contemporary newspaper accounts. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1832-1988.
The collection includes the proceedings for 1856-1988 of the Republican National Conventions, providing gavel to gavel coverage of the conventions, including speeches, debates, votes, and party platforms. Also included are lists of names of convention delegates and alternates. Records of the earliest proceedings are based in part on contemporary newspaper accounts. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1856-1988.
This resource brings together manuscript, printed and visual primary source materials for the study of 'Empire' and its theories, practices and consequences. The materials span across the last five centuries and are accompanied by a host of secondary learning resources including scholarly essays, maps and an interactive chronology. Covers 1942 to 2007.
Encyclopedia Virginia is the online reference work about the Commonwealth of Virginia. It aggregates in a single resource information on Virginia history, business, politics, and geography, plus the state's proud heritage in the arts, religion, culture, and folklife. As the Encyclopedia grows, it will also explore areas of science, medicine, education, and technology and interpret the state's significance to the people of Virginia, the nation, and the world.
Citations to printed records about the Americas written in Europe before 1750. Based on the bibliography European Americana: A Chronological Guide to Works Printed in Europe Relating to The Americas, 1493-1750, by John Alden and Dennis Landis. Coverage: 1493-1700.
Fannie Lou Hamer was a voting rights activist and civil rights leader. She was instrumental in organizing Mississippi Freedom Summer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and later became the Vice-Chair of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, attending the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, New Jersey, in that capacity. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1966-1978.
The civil rights and anti-war movements, communism, Black-nationalist and white-supremacist hate groups, the Socialist Workers Party, and American radicalism. Documents from the files of the FBI. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1956-1971.
Real and perceived African American radicalism in the 20th century, including the federal scrutiny, harassment, and prosecution to which African Americans of all political persuasions were subjected. From the files of the FBI. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1920-1984.
Alphabetical lists, which include personal information, of those interred. Also summary tabulations on evacuees and on total admissions and departures for each center. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1944-1946.
The First World War portal makes available invaluable primary sources for the study of the Great War, brought together in four thematic modules. From personal collections and rare printed material to military files, artwork and audio-visual files, content highlights the experiences of soldiers, civilians and governments on both sides of a conflict that shook the world.
During the 1930s, U.S. relations with Latin America and the Caribbean changed dramatically. Growing war clouds in Europe and Asia predicated the need for securing resources and allies in the Western Hemisphere. Giving up unpopular military intervention, the U.S. shifted to other methods to maintain its influence in Latin America: Pan-Americanism, support for strong local leaders, the training of national guards, economic and cultural penetration, Export-Import Bank loans, financial supervision, and political subversion. This collection examines this new "Good Neighbor" policy that was adopted by the United States and its effects.
The Rotunda Founders Early Access project makes available for the first time thousands of unpublished documents from our nations founders, mostly unpublished papers, in a free online resource.
This digital collection of primary source documents helps us to understand existence on the edges of the anglophone world from 1650-1920. Discover the various European and colonial frontier regions of North America, Africa and Australasia through documents that reveal the lives of settlers and indigenous peoples in these areas.
Allows a user to search across all Gale historical digital collections that the library owns or subscribes to: 17th and 18th Century Burney Collection -- 19th Century British Newspapers -- Eighteenth Century Collections Online -- Indigenous Peoples: North America -- Nineteenth Century Collections Online -- Nineteenth Century U.S. Newspapers -- Picture Post Historical Archive -- Sabin Americana, 1500-1926 -- The Illustrated London News Historical Archive, 1842-2003 -- The Making of the Modern World -- The Times Digital Archive, 1785-1985 -- Times Literary Supplement Historical Archive, 1902-2012.
This collection comprises materials related to the planning and organization of the October 1991 Middle East Peace Conference in Madrid. It consists of correspondence, memoranda, cables, diplomatic dispatches, reports, studies, maps, and printed material which document all aspects of staging the conference as well as the conference itself. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1981-1993.
When George H. W. Bush became president in 1989 the United States had already begun to see a thawing of relations with the Soviet Union. President Bush spoke of softening relations in his inaugural address, claiming that "a new breeze is blowing," and adding that "great nations of the world are moving toward democracy through the door to freedom." This collection provides an in-depth analysis of the events leading up to the dissolution of the U.S.S.R. and its implications for U.S.-Soviet relations.
The Gilded Age provides insight into the key issues that shaped America in the late nineteenth century, including race and ethnicity, immigration, labor, women's rights, American Indians, political corruption, and monetary policy. Contains speeches, letters, diaries, interviews, video clips, artwork, song lyrics, and other ephemera. Coverage: 1865-1902
This resource brings together manuscript, printed and visual primary source materials for the study of global commodities in world history. The commodities featured in this resource have been transported, exchanged and consumed around the world for hundreds of years. They helped transform societies, global trading operations, habits of consumption and social practices.
Christian missionary activities, practices, and thought in the US. Personal narratives, organizational records, and biographies. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1800-1899.
The Globe and Mail is the national newspaper with the largest circulation in Canada and is typically cited as being the Canadian Newspaper of Record. The Globe was founded in 1844 by Scottish immigrant George Brown, a liberal who later became a Father of the Confederation, and in 1936 merged with The Mail and Empire and became The Globe and Mail.
America's longest continuously published newspaper, the Hartford Courant is older than the nation. It provides historians and other researchers a front-row seat from which to view the birth of an independent nation.
Since 2010, Hispanic Americans have accounted for more than half of all U.S. population growth, profoundly shaping the nation’s demographics, culture, and politics. With Series 3, Hispanic Life in America is updated to reflect the latest news in government, business, and arts—from the U.S. immigration policies and the response at the U.S. southern border, to the Dreamers and the fate of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA), as well as the ongoing influence of Hispanic American businesses, politicians, musicians, athletes, and others.
Researchers can access digitized letters, papers, photographs, scrapbooks, financial records, diaries, and many more primary source materials taken from the University Publications of America (UPA) Collections. Includes multiple sub-collections in broad subject areas like Civil Rights; Southern Life, Slavery, and the Civil War; American Indians and the American West; American Politics and Society; International Relations and Military Conflicts; Women's Studies; and Workers and Labor Unions. Focus of American History primary sources is largely after 1775.
The HistoryMakers Digital Archive is an extensive online database of over 9,000 hours of full-text and video interviews with African-Americans distinguished in the fields of science, culture, politics, the arts, and public life. More content being added each week.
Collection of documents from the Motion Picture Association of America Production Code Administration. The 500 titles selected from the holdings of the Margaret Herrick Library of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Beverly Hills, California. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1927-1968.
Collection of documents from the activist and professional activities of Donald S. Lucas. Contains an abundance of material relating to the early homosexual civil rights movement (the homophile movement) and the San Francisco manifestation of President Lyndon Johnson's War on Poverty. Includes: correspondence, meeting minutes, constitutions and by-laws, newsletters, manuscripts, financial documents, reports, statistics, legal decisions, surveys, counseling records, funding proposals, and subject files. An Archives Unbound database, with materials scanned from archives of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Historical Society. Coverage: 1941-1976.
Literature & the literary arts, philosophy, the arts, history, culture, and creative thought. Journal articles, books, and other sources from around the world. Coverage: Varies by title.
Collection of briefing books, hearing and meeting transcripts, reports, and press clippings documenting the activities of the National Commission on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1983-1994.
Indian Claims Insight is a one-of-a-kind research tool that provides researchers with the opportunity to understand and analyze Native American migration and resettlement throughout U.S. history, as well as U.S. Government Indian removal policies and subsequent actions to address Native American claims. Coverage: 1789-Present
From historic pressings to contemporary periodicals, explore nearly 200 years of Indigenous print journalism from the US and Canada. With newspapers representing a huge variety in publisher, audience and era, discover how events were reported by and for Indigenous communities.
Provides users with diverse and informative primary sources that will enhance research and increase understanding of the historical experiences, cultural traditions and innovations, and political status of Indigenous Peoples in the United States and Canada. The archive includes extensive monograph, manuscript, newspaper, magazines, periodical and photograph collections.
The Institution of Slavery explores, in vivid detail, the inner workings of slavery from 1492 to 1888. Through legal documents, plantation records, first-person accounts, newspapers, government records, and other primary sources, this collection reveals how enslaved people struggled against the institution. These rare works explore slavery as a legal and labor system, the relationship between slavery and religion, freed slaves, the Shong Massacre, the Demerara insurrection, and many other aspects and events.
Resettlement of refugees from Europe during the Nazi era. Memoranda, records, government documents, correspondence, and other files from the Intergovernmental Committee on Refugees. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1938-1948.
For over the past 200 years, the burning of fossil fuels, such as coal and oil, and deforestation, have caused the concentrations of heat-trapping "greenhouse gases" to increase significantly in our atmosphere. In this collection documents (1991-2009) the U.S. response to the threat posed by climatic change and global warming. The research behind the studies, reports, and analyses represents an exhaustive review of the facts, causes, and economic and political implications of a phenomenon that threatens every region of the world.
Spanning the presidential administrations of Ronald Reagan to Barack Obama, The International War on Drugs documents the United States Government's response to the global illicit drug trade. Studies, reports, and analyses compiled by governmental and military agencies demonstrate how the U.S. organized and waged a decades-long campaign against drugs. Documents in the collection include U.S. military analyses and recommendations for halting the illegal drug trade; strategy reports from the Department of State Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs; and reports from the Congressional Research Service. Topics covered include terrorism and drug trafficking; money laundering and financial crimes; individual country reports and actions against drugs; U.S. policy initiatives and programs; U.S. bilateral and regional counterdrug initiatives.
Meredith's efforts to become the first African American to attend the University of Mississippi. FBI documents, correspondence, memoranda, and news clippings. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1961-1962.
This archive charts a key decade in U.S.-Japanese relations. It is is one of three digital collections based on the microfilm title Records of the U.S. Department of State Relating to United States Political Relations with Japan, 1930-1954. The source material contains Decimal File 711.94. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1930-1939.
The concerns and challenges of interned Japanese Americans during World War II. Bulletins and newspapers. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1942-1945.
The Jewish Advocate was first printed in Boston in 1909. It continues to be a primary source of regional, national and international news and information for subscribers in New England and across the U.S., as well around the world. This digital newspaper archive (1905-1990) provides an in-depth historical perspective on issues and events pertaining to the rise of Zionism and the development of Jewish-American culture.
Based on a rich variety of original manuscript collections from the American Jewish Historical Society in New York, this resource offers captivating insights into the everyday lives of the American Jewish population over three centuries. Collection includes 24 collections of personal papers (which include letters, scrapbooks, autobiographies, and notebooks), 6 collections of organizational papers, photographs, and printed books and pamphlets.
Multidisciplinary full-text journal articles from 1,500 major journals. Please note: In many cases, JSTOR does not include the most recent 3 to 5 years of these journals. Please use other databases to retrieve recent articles, especially for current events topics. Coverage: Varies by title. Access is available to 2007+ alumni; requires W&M userid and password.
John A. Ryan was the foremost social justice advocate and theoretician in the Catholic Church during the first half in the 20th century. Ryan was a Professor of Political Science and Professor of Moral Theology at the Catholic University of America from 1915 until 1939 and Director of the National Catholic Welfare Council's Social Action Department during its first 25 years, from 1920 until his death in 1945. Ryans relationship with President Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal both personally and politically garnered him the nickname "Right Reverend New Dealer." The John A. Ryan Papers span from 1892 to 1945, with a heavy focus on the last twenty years of his life, 1925 to 1945. Most of the collection consists of Ryans correspondence, focusing on the Catholic Church, politics, and Ryans writings, speaking engagements, and personal matters. The Ryan Papers also include articles, sermons, reports, pamphlets, lecture notes, scrapbooks, and a personal journal.
History Vault's coverage of social movements and issues of race and ethnicity expands in this category with coverage of Latinx History.
ProQuest Leftist Newspapers and periodicals is a collection of English-language publications spanning beyond the 20th century (1845-2015) covering Communist, Socialist and Marxist thought, theory and practice. Issues covered include workers rights, organized labor, labor strikes, Nazi atrocities, McCarthyisms rise after WWII, Civil Rights, and modern-day class struggles which give rise to renewed interest in alternative social organizations. This collection includes 145 titles with over 150,000 digitized pages.
Market Research and American Business, 1935-1965, provides a unique insight into the American consumer boom and advertising of the mid-20th century through access to the complete market research reports of Ernest Dichter, the eras foremost consumer analyst, market research pioneer and widely-recognised father of Motivational Research.
Collection comprises two sets of documents that helped the response to 40 years of failed Native American policies. Provide unique documentary insights into many major tribes: Sioux, Navaho, Quapaw, Chickasaw, Apache, Pueblo, Ute, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Arapaho, Kickapoo, Klamath, and many others. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1928-1943.
Beyond major events covering nearly two centuries, including the states pivotal role in the American Civil War, and other national and international news, the digitized pages of The Nashville Tennessean (18122002) provide unique historical insight into the regional issues and concerns, such as local government, industrialization, prohibition, and racial struggles. Coverage: 1812-2002
This collection provides insight into the recent history of the surveillance of aliens and national security during World War II and the early postwar period. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1940-1978.
Collection of historical primary-source databases. See titles of individual databases for further information. Coverage: Varies by title.
The United States kept a contingent force in Nicaragua almost continually from 1912 until 1933. Although reduced to 100 in 1913, the contingent served as a reminder of the willingness of the United States to use force and its desire to keep conservative governments in power. This collection provides documentation on the almost continual political instability in Nicaragua. An Archives Unbound database, scanned from National Archives Department of State records. Coverage: 1910-1933.
These files from the National Archives of the United Kingdom allow scholars and researchers the opportunity to assess, from a British, European and Commonwealth perspective, Nixons handling of numerous Cold War crises, his administrations notable achievements, as well as his increasingly controversial activities and unorthodox use of executive powers culminating in Watergate and resignation.
North American Immigrant Letters, Diaries and Oral Histories includes 2,162 authors and approximately 100,000 pages of information, so providing a unique and personal view of what it meant to immigrate to America and Canada between 1800 and 1950. Composed of contemporaneous letters and diaries, oral histories, interviews, and other personal narratives relating to American and Canadian immigrants.
Offers peer-reviewed annotated bibliographies on African and African American Studies. Bibliographies are browseable by subject area and keyword searchable.
Peer-reviewed annotated bibliographies on the transnational interconnections between Europe, North America, South America, and Africa, particularly in the early modern and colonial period.
Cross-searchable library containing the full text and abstracts of classic and newly published Oxford books. Swem Library has access to Biology, Business & Management, Classical Studies, Economics and Finance, History, Law, Linguistics, Literature, Mathematics, Music, Neuroscience, Palliative Care, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Public Health & Epidemiology, Religion, Social Work, and Sociology subject modules.
The collection consists of rare works of poetry, organizational records, print publications, over one hundred articles, poems, plays, and speeches by Baraka, a small amount of personal correspondence, and oral histories. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1913-1998.
The entire Jackson edition, comprising the 9 volumes published so far through the year 1831, is now available in a fully searchable digital format within the American Founding Era collection.
A collection of letters, diaries, and other documents from a mother and daughter in South Carolina covering 1739 to 1830. An interesting look into the daily life of the management of an early American household and plantation.
Considered the authoritative edition of the correspondence and papers of Washington. Searchable across all volumes. Begun by editors Donald Jackson and Dorothy Twohig and continued by Edward Lengel. A Rotunda Collections database. Coverage ongoing, begins 1744.
Considered the authoritative edition of the correspondence and papers of Madison. Searchable across all volumes. Begun by editors William T. Hutchinson and William M. E. Rachal and continued by Barbara Oberg. A Rotunda Collections database. Coverage: 1751-1820.
The Papers of James Monroe provides easy access to a wide selection of original material, inviting a fresh assessment of this important figure and his legacy. This digital edition of Monroes papers includes the complete contents of the seven volumes in print to date.
This digital edition covers the complete papers of John Marshall, the longest-serving chief justice on the United States Supreme Court. Under his direction, the judicial branch achieved equality with the other branches of government and constitutionality was established as the crucial element in court decisions. This edition brings together all twelve printed volumes published from 1974 to 2006 into one searchable online resource.
Considered the authoritative edition of the correspondence and papers of Jefferson. Searchable across all volumes. Begun by editor Julian Boyd and continued by Barbara Oberg. A Rotunda Collections database. Coverage ongoing, begins 1760.
The ROTUNDA Digital Edition includes the complete contents of the landmark letterpress edition of the papers, with nearly 35,000 documents across 69 volumes, with new material forthcoming from the Library of Congress and the Wilson Presidential Library. Coverage: 1856-1924.
The VIVA PBS streaming video collection, hosted for VIVA at UVA, includes 498 full-length documentaries representing over 500 hours of video. Titles include documentaries by Ken Burns and series such as American Experience and Frontline. Must sign in with your home organization: William & Mary
Concerns internment of Japanese Americans and Aleuts during World War II. Testimony of witnesses & others, personal stories, publications, reports, press releases, photographs, newspaper clippings, etc,. related to the hearings. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1981.
The Philadelphia Inquirer, one of the longest surviving daily newspapers in the United States, is known for its coverage of the American Civil War that was popular with readers on both sides; its published works by Charles Dickens and Edgar Allen Poe; and its reporting of breaking news in the city, country, and around the world.
The oldest continuously published black newspaper, is dedicated to the needs and concerns of the fourth largest black community in the U.S. During the 1930s the paper supported the growth of the United Way, rallied against the riots in Chester, PA, and continuously fought against segregation.
The first US lesbian rights organization. Correspondence, manuscripts, organizational papers, constitutions, flyers, legal & financial documents, etc. An Archives Unbound database. Materials scanned for the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Historical Society collection in, San Francisco, California. Coverage: 1955-1984.
This database provides full page and article images with searchable full text from the Courier (1950-1954 : City ed.), New Pittsburgh Courier (1969-1981 : City ed.), New Pittsburgh Courier (1981-2002), Pittsburgh Courier (1911-1950 : City ed.), and Pittsburgh Courier (1955-1965 : City ed.).
This unique collection showcases the development of 'popular' medicine in America during the nineteenth century, through an extensive range of material that was aimed at the general public rather than medical professionals. Explore an array of printed sources, including advertisements, posters, broadsides, rare books, pamphlets, trade cards, and visually-rich advertising ephemera.
Collection of databases devoted to disciplines in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. See titles of individual databases for further information. Coverage: Varies by database.
This database covers a vast range of topics including the formative economic factors and other forces that led to the abolitionist movement, the 600,000 battle casualties and the emancipation of nearly 4 million slaves. Includes newspapers, advertisements, editorials, letters, obituaries, ephemera
Queer Pasts is a collection of primary source exhibits for students and scholars of queer history and culture. The database uses queer in its broadest and most inclusive sense, to embrace topics that are gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) and to include work on sexual and gender formations that are queer but not necessarily LGBT. Each of the document collections in the database will include a critical introductory essay that helps explain the significance of the primary sources in historical terms and in relationship to previous scholarship. We ask our project editors to address the strengths, limitations, and characteristics of their archive and to explore the ways in which archives are constructed, constrained, and contested. This database seeks to broaden the field of queer history, including projects that focus on the experiences and perspectives of under-represented historical groups, including people of color, trans people, and people with disabilities.
This collection is a unique resource for the study of the era of the American civil rights movement. Included here are transcriptions of close to 700 interviews with those who made history in the struggles for voting rights, against discrimination in housing, for the desegregation of the schools, to expose racism in hiring, in defiance of police brutality, and to address poverty in the African American communities. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1967-1973.
Spanning the years 1901-1918, this publication "devoted to the coal industry" provides a unique research opportunity. The coal industry was a major foundation for American industrialization. As a fuel source, coal provided a cheap and efficient source of power for steam engines, furnaces, and forges across America. As an economic pursuit, coal spurred innovations in technology, energy consumption, consumerism, and transportation. When mining companies brought increased sophistication to the organization of work in the mines, coal miners responded by organizing into trade unions. The influence of coal was so pervasive in America that by the advent of the twentieth century, it became a necessity of everyday life. This publication traces the expansion of the coal industry in the early twentieth century and brings to life the trials and tribulations of a burgeoning industry.
Activities of the Republic of New Afrika leaders, power struggles within the organization, its growing militancy, and its affiliations with other black militant organizations. Documentation collected by the FBI, including newspaper and periodical articles, books, pamphlets, broadsides, leaflets, etc. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1968-1980.
Revolution and Protest Online explores the protest movements, revolutions, and civil wars that have transformed societies and human experience from the 18th century through the present. It is organized around more than thirty events and areas, representing a variety of time periods, regions, and topics. Includes American Revolution, Arab Spring, Chinese Communist Revolution, Civil Rights Movement, Cuban Revolutions, Hungarian Revolution, Iranian Revolutions, Russian Revolutions, and others.
This is the gateway to publications in Rotunda, the digital imprint of the University of Virginia Press. Rotunda includes scholarly digital editions of historical, architectural, and literary resources.
John Jays accomplishments span pre- and post-Revolutionary history and extend into all three branches of government. When President Washington appointed Jay, the court was a blank slate, and his papers provide a fascinating look at the creation of court procedure, much of which survives to this day. Fully annotated and searchable, this XML-based archive of Jays papers will include all seven volumes planned for the complete print edition.
This digital resource reveals the story of war as told by the newspapers that brought information, entertainment and camaraderie to the forces at home and overseas. Explore over 300 titles from key nations across the globe that took part in the world-changing conflict.
The looks at gender and sexuality in the centuries leading up to, and inclusive of, the period covered in Parts I and II of LGBTQ History and Culture since 1940, providing context to the materials in those collections. It examines topics such as patterns of fertility and sexual practice; prostitution; religion and sexuality; the medical and legal construction of sexualities; and the rise of sexology. It not only offers a reflection of the cultural and social attitudes of the past, but also a window into how sexuality and gender roles were viewed and changed over time.
The Sixties brings the 1960s alive through diaries, letters, autobiographies and other memoirs, written and oral histories, manifestos, government documents, memorabilia, and scholarly commentary. Coverage: 1960-1974
Slave Trade in the Atlantic World charts the inception of slavery in Africa and its rise as perpetuated on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, placing particular emphasis on the Caribbean, Latin America, and United States. This collection was developed by an international editorial board with scholars specializing in North American, European, African, and Latin American/Caribbean aspects of the slave trade. Includes customs records, court cases, shipping records, manuscripts, personal papers, letters, trade records, and other materials.
Includes collections on the transatlantic slave trade, the global movement for the abolition of slavery, the legal, personal, and economic aspects of the slavery system, and the dynamics of emancipation in the U.S. as well as in Latin America, the Caribbean, and other regions. Part 1. Debates over slavery and abolition; Part 2. Slave trade in the Atlantic world; Part 3. The institution of slavery; Part 4. The age of emancipation. Includes legal documents, plantation records, first-person accounts, newspapers, government records, and other primary sources Covers: 1492 to 1888.
Brings together, for the first time, all known legal materials on slavery in the United States and the English-speaking world. This includes every statute passed by every colony and state on slavery, every federal statute dealing with slavery, and all reported state and federal cases on slavery. The library has hundreds of pamphlets and books written about slavery--defending it, attacking it or simply analyzing it. Covers 1450s to 1880s.
Slavery in Antebellum Southern Industries presents some of the richest, most valuable, and most complete collections in the entire documentary record of American slavery, focusing on the industrial uses of slave labor. The materials selected include company records; business and personal correspondence; documents pertaining to the purchase, hire, medical care, and provisioning of slave laborers; descriptions of production processes; and journals recounting costs and income.
This digital collection documents key aspects of the history of slavery worldwide over six centuries, with 16 key areas of focus: slavery in the early Americas; African coast; the Middle Passage; slavery and agriculture; urban and domestic slavery; slave testimony; spiritualism and religion in slave communities; resistance and revolts; the Underground Railroad; the abolition movement and the slavery debate; legislation and politics; freed slaves, freedmen and free black settlements; education; slavery and the Islamic world; varieties of slave experience; slavery today and the legacy of slavery. Documents include legal materials and court cases, broadsides, court records, maps, pamphlets, lists of enslaved peoples, ship's logs, registers, and reports. The collection also includes case studies from America, the Caribbean, Brazil, and Cuba.
The backfiles of more than 25 periodicals reflecting the 20th/21st–century history of a variety of movements and ideologies on the political left. These titles include Marxist, socialist, communist, social democratic, and Fabianist publications, addressing key topics and events such as labour history / workers' rights, international socialism, anti-Nazi movements, Red Scares, class struggles, campaigns / legislation, and youth radicalism.
This database consists of nine modules: Slavery and the Law; Slavery in Antebellum Southern Industries; records focused on the Slave trade and other legal issues pertaining to slavery; four modules of Southern Life and African American History, 1775-1915, Plantation Records; a module on the Civil War entitled "Confederate Military Manuscripts and Records of Union Generals and the Union Army"; and Reconstruction and Military Government after the Civil War.
The Toronto Star is the highest circulation newspaper in Canada and was unique among early North American newspapers in its consistent advocacy of ordinary people. It was an advocate of social causes and is generally considered to be the most leftwing of Canada's major newspapers and a major influence on the development of Canadian social policy.
This collection consists of unique records of U.S. agencies established to intervene in Vietnam-the country U.S. foreign policy deemed a lynchpin in the free world's fight against communism. The Subject Files from the Office of the Director, U.S. Operations Missions, document the myriad concerns and rationales that went into the control and direction of U.S. economic and technical assistance programs, as well as the coordination of mutual security activities, with respect to Vietnam.
Documents in this collection illustrate Cold War contexts, the role of the United States in Venezuela's foreign affairs, and the centrality of oil in the Venezuelan economy. Examples include a U.S. Department of State telegram titled "Communist Subversion in Venezuela," which details "three foreign Communists" being held on "charges of conspiring to overthrow the government, illegally purchasing arms and disseminating Red propaganda..." Illustrations of the Castro-Communist insurgency in Venezuela include a letter from Ambassador Stewart C. Allen to the Secretary of State that details a detachment of Marines being sent "[to] guard Maracaibo Lake installations and security installations elsewhere being strengthened. "Meanwhile arrest extremist labor leaders continuing in oil fields on direct instructions [to] State Governors from President" (October 1962). Other documents detail a range of issues, such as: clarification of Venezuelan boundaries; multiple balance sheets for the Central Bank of Venezuela; and police corruption in Zulia, one of Venezuela's twenty-three states.
Includes fully searchable previously unpublished transcripts of over 500 documents from the Virginia Company Archives; records of the Virginia Company of London; complete Ferrar Papers from Magdalene College, Cambridge; and a wide range of maps, illustrations, and other works. Coverage: 1590-1790.
Full page and article images with searchable full text back to the first issue. Coverage: 1889-2002.
The relationship between the US government and Native American nations. Letters to and from the War Department, speeches, proceedings of conferences, licenses of traders, passports for Indian country, instructions to commissioners, superintendents, agents & other officials, etc. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1800-1824.
A collection of documents from the National Archives and the U.S. Department of State Library dealing with private armed vessels used during the War of 1812. Documents include correspondence concerning letters of marque for privateers, agreements for the exchange of prisoners of war, passenger lists of vessels sailing from the U.S., and intercepted correspondence. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1814 (with some documents from 1789-1807).
Full page and article images with searchable full text back to the first issue. Coverage: 1877-2004.
African American history, radical studies, civil rights, and political science. Documents from the FBI chronicle the interracial group that left Washington on May 4, 1961, bound for New Orleans. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1961.
Women and Social Movements in Modern Empires since 1820 explores prominent themes in world history since 1820: conquest, colonization, settlement, resistance, and post-coloniality, as told through womens voices. Includes materials from women in the Asian Empires, European Empires, Ottoman and Post-Ottoman Empires, Native Women in North America, Settler Society in North America, South Africa, the United States, and Globally.
US history and US women's history. Primary documents, books, images, scholarly essays, book reviews, web site reviews, the biographical dictionary Notable American Women, and all publications of local, state, and national commissions on the status of women since 1963. Coverage: 1600-2000.
The progression of womens rights through documents presented to President Ford from The Special Assistant to the President for Women. Meeting minutes, briefing papers, correspondence, talking points, speeches, news clippings, etc. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1974-1977.
Historical women's periodicals provide an important resource to scholars interested in the lives of women, the role of women in society and, in particular, the development of the public lives of women as the push for women's rights--woman suffrage, fair pay, and better working conditions grew in the United States and England. An Archives Unbound database. Coverage: 1786-1933.
The Women's Studies modules in History Vault consist of records of suffrage organizations and other women's rights organizations; personal papers of women's rights advocates, many of whom were involved in the suffrage movement; and records on women at work during World War II.
This database currently focuses on workers and the American labor movement since the Civil War and consists of several collections. Workers, Labor Unions, and the American Left in the 20th Century consists of federal government records and has strong coverage of strikes and radical labor unions in the first half of the 20th Century. Labor Unions in the U.S., 1862-1974: Knights of Labor, AFL, CIO, and AFL-CIO, consists of records sourced from the Wisconsin Historical Society, Catholic University of America, and the AFL-CIO. American Federation of Labor Records: The Samuel Gompers Era, 1877-1937, focuses on the career of one of the most influential labor leaders in American History. The Socialist Party of America Papers document the party's revolutionary efforts, as well as their involvement in several major reform movements of the 20th century. The most recent module in this category is the papers of the Labor Priest, John A. Ryan, sourced by ProQuest from the holdings of the Catholic University of America.

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